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10-1-2014

Arrested after claiming to
be a DEA agent
Also portrayed himself as a doctor

by Valerie Verkamp
Landmark assistant editor

A man portraying to be both an agent with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and a medical physician at the Kansas Institute of Medicine attempted to purchase a fraudulent prescription from a pharmacy in Riverside.

The Platte County Prosecutor's Office charged William Brislan, 36, of Kansas City, with a class D felony of fraudulently attempting to obtain Hydrocodone and a class A misdemeanor of false impersonation.

According to court documents, Brislan allegedly telephoned a pharmacist at Phillips Family Pharmacy located inside Red X in Riverside around 4 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22.

Claiming to be Dr. Regina Heidner from the Kansas Institute of Medicine, Brislan requested a prescription for 60 pills of 7.5 mgs of Hydrocodone for an alleged patient by the name of William Brislan.

Although the caller was able to provide most of the necessary information needed to properly request a prescription, the pharmacist suspected the caller was not who they claimed to be over the phone.

The caller attempted to speak in a feminine tone, but sounded much too masculine. Following her suspicion, the pharmacist reached the Kansas Institute of Medicine and was told the prescription was indeed fraudulent.

The pharmacist then contacted the Riverside Police Department.

Afterwards, the pharmacist attempted to reach Brislan on the telephone, but was told she reached Detective Wilber Shields. Brislan, portraying to be Det. Shields, told the pharmacist he was conducting an undercover operation with the intent of arresting someone trying to purchase a prescription with fraudulent identification.

He described the wrongdoer as a 6 foot male, wearing a red shirt. Brislan told the pharmacist she could sell the prescription at her discretion, but the purchaser would immediately be arrested outside of Red X.

At 5:25 p.m. Brislan arrived at Phillips Pharmacy and presented a valid Missouri driver's license and insurance card. He purchased the fraudulent prescription with $10 cash.

Outside, Brislan was confronted by two officers with the Riverside Police Department. During the initial arrest, Brislan told officers, “I'm with the DEA,” and to contact the DEA agent known as “Green Lantern,” to rectify the situation.

While Brislan was interviewed at the police station, Brislan told authorities a woman who worked at the Kansas Institute of Medicine had previously supplied him a number of prescriptions. He also told authorities that he met with DEA agents, but decided to go “vigilante” on this case.

Brislan later told authorities he was trying to prove to the DEA he is someone to reckon with, states court documents.

Later, Brislan allegedly confessed he illegally pretended to be a licensed physician when he called the prescription into the pharmacy and admitted to telling the pharmacist he was Detective Wilbur Shields during another phone call.

Court documents indicate Brislan said, “I was trying to live vicariously through the law enforcement agency.”

Authorities also confirmed that Dr. Regina Heidner, who Brislan portrayed on the phone, previously worked at the Kansas Institute of Medicine.

Circuit Court Judge Ann Hansbrough initially set Brislan's bail at $5,000 cash only.

On Sept. 24 he pled not guilty in front of Judge Quint Shafer and asked for a bond reduction. Shafer agreed to make the reduction, allowing for 10% surety, meaning by posting $500 Brislan could be released. He is no longer in custody.

According to court documents, a condition of bond is that Brislan wear a drug patch.

 


WILLIAM BRISLAN